Shrimp Cakes

After a very long hiatus, I’m back! The past year has been a whirlwind of major life events – I got engaged and am currently planning the wedding, my fiancé got sworn in as a police officer, I got a major breast reduction and bought a house – PHEW! While my fiancé was training (for about three and a half months), I discovered meal subscription boxes, which are now one of my favorite things. Blue Apron, Plated, PeachDish, HelloFresh, HomeChef – they’re all the great in their own way and I should probably do a comprehensive review of them all. Even though they’re awesome, they have definitely cut down on my creativity in the kitchen since I’m not developing my own recipes nearly as often as I did previously. However, I by no means rely on these for every meal and am still regularly coming up with yummy things to eat.

These delicious little cakes came to be because my fiancé used the ground turkey I needed for one of my Blue Apron meals to make chili and I didn’t feel like making any of the meals I had. While wondering what to make and craving crab cakes, I remembered the shrimp waiting to be used and decided to try making shrimp cakes. With a rough recollection of a past-used crab cake recipe, this is what I came up with. Most crab cake and probably shrimp cake recipes use mayonnaise; I chose to try using Greek yogurt here and had great results with texture and flavor. I served with a whole grain mustard and Greek yogurt sauce over a bed of spinach and alongside lightly roasted red potatoes. Mm mmm.

Shrimp Cakes 1Shrimp Cakes 2

Shrimp Cakes

12 oz shrimp (feel free to use any leftover precooked shrimp as well)
1/3 c Italian breadcrumbs, plus extra for coating
1/4 c all purpose flour, plus extra for coating
1 large egg, lightly beaten
2 1/2 T plain Greek yogurt
1 t chopped jalepeno, seeds removed, optional
1 1/2 t garlic powder

Begin heating a small saucepan of water to medium-high heat. Before water has heated, add shrimp and cook until just pink. Drain, peel, dry with a paper towel and chop.

While shrimp is cooking, add all other ingredients to a medium bowl. Stir in cooked, chopped shrimp until evenly distributed. Form mixture into four evenly divided cakes.

Combine equal quantities of additional breacrumbs and flour and lightly bread cakes.

In a nonstick pan, heat 3 T of olive oil over medium-high heat. Cook cakes for 3-4 minutes on each side or until golden brown.

Serve with sauce of your choosing.

Shrimp Cakes 3

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Kimchi, Cucumber & Avocado Salad

While I was in college, I worked at Japanese sushi restaurant. Like most Japanese restaurants in the U.S., the place at which I worked was owned and operated by a Korean family. Before each shift, all employees and the owner (who was also the head chef) would sit down for a meal. This meal was usually interesting, sometimes a little strange and always very Korean. It’s not surprising then that kimchi was such a common occurrence on the table. Strange to me at first, kimchi became something I crave quite often. I go through spurts when I eat it just about daily and while I don’t make my own, the store bought variety fits the bill just fine for me.

My favorite way to eat kimchi is simply as a salad topper.

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ingredients
1/2 avocado, thinly sliced
1/2 cucumber, thinly sliced
1 t fish sauce
1/4 c kimchi
1/2 T basil, chopped
Dash black pepper

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Pumpkin Macaroni & Cheese

Fall has become synonymous with pumpkins – anything and everything pumpkin imaginable. There are many other flavors and foods I enjoy in the fall months but the obsession with pumpkin does hearken to seasonality. Not only are pumpkins in season but so are brussels sprouts, carrots, sage, rutabagas and a myriad of squash and gourds. Early fall is a time for a shifting of gears from tomatoes, cucumbers and the like to the fall crops.

That being said, I do love pumpkin. We tend polarize it more than other squash varieties by relegating it to pies, breads and lattes; rather than restricting this gourd, we should let it’s versatility shine. Many years ago, I remember watching Food Network’s Ellie Krieger put together a beautiful macaroni and cheese in which she incorporated squash puree to sneak in vegetables. After stocking up on pumpkin puree this dish came to mind and I decided to try my hand at a pumpkin macaroni and cheese. With classic Southern mac & cheese in mind, I put together what I thought would a full-bodied pumpkin version and I was not disappointed. The result was deliciously creamy, cheesy and rich albeit not low in fat by any means but that’s okay with me;

Finished Product (2)

Ingredients

10 oz whole wheat elbow macaroni or mini penne
1 1/2 c pumpkin puree
1/2 c dry white wine
1/4 c unsalted chicken stock
1 c milk
1/2 c cream
2 oz. pancetta, choppped
1/2 shallot, chopped
1/2 c ricotta
1/8 t cardamom
1 t dijon mustard
1 pinch salt
1/4 t chili powder
1 t rosemary, finely chopped
1 c sharp cheddar, finely grated
1/4 c Jarlsberg, finely grated
2 eggs, beaten
1/2 c fresh breadcrumbs
1/2 c shaved Parmesan
2 slices deli cheese, provolone or swiss

Instructions

Heat oven to 375F.

Cook pasta until al dente, drain and set aside.

In a small pan, saute chopped shallot and pancetta. Set aside.

Chopped Pancetta Chopped Shallots

In a large saucepan, bring white wine and chicken stock to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and stir in pumpkin, milk, ricotta, shallots and pancetta. Allow to cook over medium for about 15 minutes; stir in cardamom, dijon, rosemary, chili powder, salt and pepper. Temper beaten eggs with sauce (so as not to scramble); then add to sauce.

Tempering Eggs

Slowly stir in sharp cheddar and Jarlsberg until combined. Add the cooked pasta to the sauce.

Adding Cheese to Sauce

Combine breadcrumbs and Parmesan. Set aside. Pour pasta and sauce into a 9×9 baking dish. Tear apart slices of deli cheese and add place on top of pasta. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs and Parmesan over top.

Cheese Breadcrumb Topping

Bake for 20-25 minutes or until bubbly and golden. Serve hot.

Finished Product

Servings Given

Black Bean Espresso Chili

Well I believe it’s safe to say that fall weather is officially here in South Carolina, which means late spring temperatures in the afternoon and winter temperatures at night. With that said, our low here in the Lowcountry was in the forties Sunday night and into Monday morning. When the weather turns chilly, what better to warm you up than soup or stew, or how about chili? I decided to go the chili route.

The wonderful thing about chili is that is that it’s infinitely adjustable and this recipe is something I scrapped together from my pantry and took very little effort. The espresso adds a mysterious smoky zip that’s complimented by a dash of cinnamon. The pumpkin doesn’t stand out on its own, but rather works to add thickness and depth (no, it won’t taste like pumpkin spice chili). I added a little more spice than I recorded, simply because my hunny loves him some hot chili. The way it’s recorded is more to my taste but it’s equally good extra spicy. I have to admit this was pretty addictive – I already have requests to make this again.

 Served with Shrimp

Black Bean Espresso Chili

3 T olive oil
1 red onion, chopped
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
1 16 oz can unseasoned black beans, drained
1 17.64 oz box rustic chopped tomatoes, undrained
1 c pumpkin puree
1-2 c water
1 1/2 T instant espresso powder
2 T chili paste
2 T cayenne
1/4 t cinnamon
1 t cumin
3 T fresh cilantro, chopped, plus extra for serving
1/2 t black pepper
1 1/2 T Sriracha
Plain Greek yogurt to serve, optional
1 1/2 T green onion, chopped, to serve, optional
In a large saucepan, cook red onion over medium heat until just softened. Add garlic and cook until golden.

Sautee Onion

Add black beans, tomatoes, pumpkin puree and water; stir well to combine and bring to a low boil for about 10 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low and ad espresso, chili paste, cayenne, cinnamon, cumin, black pepper, Sriracha and cilantro.

Add Tomatoes

Add Chili Paste

Cover and allow to simmer for 30-45 minutes, checking for sticking and stirring every few minutes.

Serve topped with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt, cilantro and green onion. I added sauteed shrimp to mine as well, you know for extra protein and just because I love me some skrumps.


Served with Shrimp

Blue Cheese-Balsamic Roasted Cauliflower

I had no intentions of making anything blog-worthy for supper last night: I marinated a large salmon filet in orange juice, bourbon, soy sauce and honey, topped it with fresh dill and broiled. This is served quite often in my home. The particularly great part of supper was not this salmon, although it is always more than satisfying, but was this cauliflower dish I threw together in a rather haphazard manner.

Cauliflower is one of those vegetables that everyone loves to hate. I’ll admit that it usually not presented in the best way. As a child, cauliflower was rarely served and when it was, it was typically mushy and slathered in some yellow-orange ‘cheese sauce’ or on vegetable trays with copious amounts of ranch dressing. When I decided on last night’s vegetable, I was almost hesitant to use the big white bunch staring up at me from the crisper but I washed it and went about dissecting it. From that point, I just threw together a few ingredients from my refrigerator and cupboard. The result was almost too good to let go to the oven – I ate a good 25% of it uncooked because it was just so darn tasty. The finished product had just enough creaminess, just enough crunch and the balsamic resulted in just the right amount of caramelization. Also, cauliflower is chock full of vitamin C, K, B6 and omega-3’s, among other vitamins and nutrients, so eat up!

Blue Cheese Balsamic Cauliflower

1 head cauliflower, washed and separated in florets
3 T olive oil
1/4 red onion, chopped
2 T or a good drizzling balsamic vinegar
1 T herbes de Provence
1/4 c blue cheese crumbles (blue cheese dressing would work well and lend creaminess)
1/4 c shredded Romano or Parmesan, optional.

Heat oven to 450F.

In a large bowl, toss cauliflower florets and chopped red onion with olive oil. Toss in herbes de Provence and blue cheese.

Drizzle in balsamic and stir to combine.

Place in 9×9 glass dish and bake for 15 minutes. Remove from oven and top with Romano; return to oven for 5 additional minutes.

I regret to inform that this is the only picture I can provide
The Only Photograph

Pan-Seared Lebanese Lamb Chops and Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Hickory Nuts

I don’t believe that I’ve yet to rave about my love for this highly under appreciated meat. Growing up, lamb was never cooked in my house; my mom said it made her sad to think of cooking the lamb of God. I find that idea to be pretty ridiculous since in my line of thinking, all creatures are of God and I happily consume others, so why leave out the lamb?

My first introduction to lamb was at a wonderful Greek restaurant that is sadly now closed. The place was in North Charleston and looked a bit dingy on the outside but once you walked in, the smells were intoxicating. I remember going as a little girl and marveling at the two gigantic fish tanks in one of which a huge eel slowly crept. North Towne, as it was called, had the best of just about anything you’d expect to find it your standard Greek restaurant. Most people probably don’t know this but Charleston has a large and long-standing Greek population; our local cuisine has been graced with that of the Greeks for well over a century. That being said, I owe it to Charleston Greeks for introducing me to lamb as a young child who refused to order from the lacking kid’s menu. The subtleties of its taste are outstanding. Provided it is properly prepared, lamb is tender, succulent and bursting with flavor. I would gladly denounce beef for the rest of my life it was reasonable to replace it with lamb. As it is, lamb is not the easiest meat to come across in the U.S. Americans don’t seem to appreciate it like so many other regions of the world.

With my introduction to lamb being Greek, it’s not surprising that my favorite preparations tend to be Mediterranean. When people think of the Mediterranean, they’re usually thinking of Europe – Greece, Italy, southern France. However, the Mediterranean is vast and includes the Middle East and Northern Africa. With borders touching Israel, Jordan and Syria, Lebanon is right on the Mediterranean. Among my cookbook collection is a small, old Lebanese recipe collection, much like one that you’d have from any of your local Baptist churches. The recipe I am sharing today borrows heavily from these Lebanese antecdotes.

I also have to add that hickory nuts are particularly delicious with the eggplant, although you could just as well use walnuts, pecans or even hazelnuts. I happen to have more hickory nuts than I know what do with at the moment because I ended up a collecting a very large bucketful during an unsuccessful dove hunt this past weekend.

Served

Pan-Seared Lebanese Lamb Chops

5 shoulder lamb chops
olive oil
sea salt
2 T cumin
2 T cinnamon
2 T oregano
1/2 T paprika
3-4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1/4 mint leaves, chopped
1/2 c fruity dry red wine (I used my favorite red blend – Save Me, San Francisco’s Drops of Jupiter)
1 T tomato paste
1/3 c lemon juice

Ingredients

Place lamb chops In a 9×9 glass baking dish. Rub both sides of each chop with sea salt (salt as you like, I use very little). In a small bowl, combine cumin, cinnamon, oregano and paprika; rub lamb with seasoning mixture on each side. In another small bowl, whisk together garlic, mint, wine, tomato paste and lemon juice; pour over lamb. Marinate lamb for at least one hour, flipping once halfway through.

Marinating Lamb Chops

Once marinating has completed, place lamb chops on a meat cutting board and pat dry. In a heavy pan, pour just enough olive oil to coat the bottom; bring to high heat. Once heated, sear lamb chops for about three minutes on each side. Lamb should be rare to medium rare, depending on your taste. Be very careful to not overcook lamb, as it becomes dry and tough. Also remember that the meat will to continue to cook once removed from direct heat.

Drying Marinated Lamb ChopsSearing Lamb Chops

I served with a red wine reduction and the roasted eggplant included below.

Roasted Eggplant with Toasted Hickory Nuts

1-2 large graffiti or regular eggplant
olive oil
sea salt, to taste
herbes de provence
herbed chèvre
15 hickory nuts, chopped

Heat oven to 375°F.

Slice eggplant in half lengthwise. Slice halves once more so that there are four eggplant slices about 1/2″ thick each. Place on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle with sea salt to taste and liberally sprinkle with herbes de provence.

Prepared Eggplant 2

Roast for about 10 minutes. While eggplant is roasting, place a small pan over medium-high heat and toast hickory nuts until fragrant and lightly darkened. Nuts should have slightly more crunch than before.

Toasting Hickory Nuts

Remove eggplant from oven and top each slice with desired amount of crumbled herbed chèvre and an even amount of toasted hickory nuts. Return to oven for three more minutes.

Finished Eggplant

And there you have it. I made this to serve two with enough for leftovers to bring to work for lunch. This meal would be great for entertaining guests or for a  romantic evening. I just really wanted lamb.

Blackened Chicken with Grapefruit Chermoula & Sweet Potato with Ginger-Orange Butter

The past few weeks have been full of health issues for myself and my family. I spent a week out of work after a surgical procedure and Caleb’s mom was recently diagnosed with breast cancer. Things just seem to be hitting us non-stop right now. Needless to say, I haven’t exactly been on my A-game in the kitchen. This meal was one I was particularly excited about though. It struck the most perfect balance of flavors and Caleb just LOVED it. It just goes to show you that a good meal can make even the gloomiest times a little brighter.

My most recent food fascination has been with North African cuisine. When flipping through my most recent copy of  Bon Appétit, I came across a wonderful recipe for Grapefruit Chermoula from Chef Cassie Piuma of Sarma in Somerville, MA. The recipe calls for preserved lemon but like many sauces, you can simply use what suits your taste and what ingredients you have readily available. I declined to use the preserved lemon because I just couldn’t find it anywhere. Instead, I combined lemon juice with a little ginger syrup and added that in the same amount as the recipe called for preserved lemon. For anyone wondering what chermoula is, I found it to be very much like a salsa but with a different combination of flavors than the typical Latin American salsa. I served it atop blackened chicken and with a side of lightly baked and sliced sweet potato drizzled with ginger-orange butter. The result felt tropical and well-balanced while being hearty enough to satisfy a very hungry man.

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Grapefruit Chermoula (courtesty of Bon Appétit)

1 grapefruit
1 large shallot, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely grated
3 T fresh lemon juice
1 t kosher salt
1/2 small preserved lemon, flesh discard, peel finely chopped
1/2 c finely chopped fresh cilantro
2 T olive oil
2 t finely grated peeled ginger
2 t harissa paste (I subbed red chili paste)
1 1/2 t ground cumin
1 t honey
1/2 t tomato paste
Freshly ground black pepper

Using a sharp knife, cut all peel and white pith from grapefruit; discard. Working over medium bowl, cut between membranes to release segments into bowl. Squeeze in juice from membranes as needed to amke 2 T juice; discard membranes and reserve any extra juice for another use. Coarsely chop segments, return to bowl.

Combine shallot, garlic, lemon juice and 1 t salt in a medium bowl; let shand 10 minutes (this will mellow shallot and garlic). Mix in grapefruit, preserved lemon peel, cilantro, oil, ginger, harissa, cumin, honey and tomato paste; season with salt and pepper.

(Do ahead: Chermoula can be made 5 days ahead. Cover and chill.)

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Blackened Chicken

3-4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1/2 c olive oil
1/4 c Chef Paul Blackened Redfish seasoning
1 t garlic powder
1/2 t chili powder
1/2 t dried oregano
1/4 t black pepper

Combine dry ingredients in a small shallow dish.

Pat chicken breasts dry with a paper towel and coat with olive oil. Dip olive-oil coated chicken breasts in seasoning mixture.

Heat cast iron pan to high heat; add remaining olive oil to pan and cook chicken breasts on just below-high heat for 5-7 minutes on each side or until juices run clear.

Sweet Potato with Ginger-Orange Butter

1 large sweet potato
4 T butter
1 1/2 t fresh, minced ginger
2 t minced orange peel

I cheated a bit here by baking the sweet potato in the microwave. The sweet potato I used was quite large and I cooked it for 10 minutes. It came out just tender enough but not at all mushy. The sweet potato should be able to be sliced into medallions and hold its shape.

In a small sauce pan, heat 2 T butter over med-low heat until almost completely melted. Add orange peel and cook for about 3 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add remaining 2 T butter and melt. Stir in ginger and allow to cook a little longer. Butter should bubble a bit but not start to brown.

Slice sweet potato into 1/2″ thick medallions and arrange on plate. Drizzle with ginger-orange butter.

PS – the sweet potato with ginger-orange butter is excellent with the chermoula as well. This a plate on which all components of the meal can definitely be cut up and mixed up. I’m a person who loves to mix up the food on my plate so this was just marvelous to me.

Beet Vichyssoise

Fall activities might be in full swing by now but the weather is still hot and humid in the Lowcountry and sometimes a cool meal is in order for supper. Vichyssoise, the cool and creamy French classic is one of my favorite soups when the weather is hot but I still want something with a little substance. I’m not a fan of baked potato soups but vichyssoise is something else entirely; it’s also not all that different from the Irish potato soup my grandpa passed down to my mom and I, with the exception that his was always served hot. 

I make a huge shortcut in this soup by using store-bought juice instead of roasting and pureeing beets. This all occurred because I purchased a beet/purple carrot/purple sweet potato juice that I just could not bring myself to drink. It tasted great but not great for an actual drinking juice. Thus, I decided to make a soup out of it. I prepared a basic vichyssoise and tweaked it a little to suit the flavor of the juice. The result was bright, smooth and equally good served hot or cold. Cold is my preference but my hunny prefers his hot. Just a suggestion, really do try to use leeks instead of substituting with onion – the leeks produce a mellow flavor that onions don’t do justice.

 

Beet Vichyssoise

2 T butter
2 medium potatoes, thinly sliced
1 c chopped leeks
Leeks Chopped Leeks
2-3 cloves garlic, minced
2 c no sodium added chicken stock
1 c water
1/2 c sauvignon blanc or other dry white wine
2 c Bolthouse Farms Daily Roots or equal amount of beet juice
1/2 c cream or half & half
20 leaves fresh tarragon, finely chopped
splash lemon juice
sea salt, to taste
fresh ground black pepper, to taste (I didn’t use any but I’m sure some folks would want it)
ricotta or plain yogurt, for serving, if desired

In a large pot, melt butter over medium heat. Add sliced potatoes and saute until soft and golden; add garlic and leeks, sauteing until translucent.                                                                                                                                                      

                                                     Potatoes & Leeks

Add chicken stock and water and simmer for 20 minutes, reducing heat if necessary. Using the back of a fork, gently press on the potatoes so that they begin to break up. 

Simmering

Add wine and simmer for 15 more minutes. Then whisk in cream, pouring in a little bit a time. Stir in tarragon and whisk in splash lemon juice.  Salt/pepper to taste.

Finishing Soup

Serve immediately or refrigerate overnight. Either way, serve with a dollop of ricotta or plain yogurt, if desired.

Along with a plate of Spanish manchego, yogurt cheese, charcuterie, raw almonds and grapes, this made for an excellent casually elegant meal.  What makes this soup super outstanding is that it’s even better after one or two days. 

Served Soup    Charcuterie Platter

Moroccan Shrimp and Red Onion Sauté

Lately, I’ve had trouble finding recipes to get really pumped about. With that being said, I’m the proud owner of a pretty extensive collection of cookbooks (for a 23 year-old at least), with cookbooks ranging from the South Carolina Wildlife Cookbook, which includes great tips and recipes for cooking anything from deer to snapping turtle to beaver, to one on Lebanese classics and comfort food. My favorite cookbooks tend to be Australian; the Aussies have a penchant for great Asian fusion as well as English classics. Despite my plethora of options for finding ideas, I rarely actually use recipes. Instead, I pour through about 5 cookbooks at a time and get ideas for flavor combinations that will work. 

Last night, while trying to decide what to do with the pound of shrimp I had just purchased, I stumbled upon a great recipe in one of my go-to cookbooks. If you do not own The Bon Appetit Cookbook: Fast Easy Fresh, you must find it ASAP. This gem includes 1100 recipes that are quick, easy to follow and cover a spread of ethnic and American flavor palettes. 

The recipe for Moroccan Shrimp and Red Onion Sauté is so vibrant and full of spice – not the hot kind of spice but the delicious, fragrant kind. I served it atop roasted chick peas and brown rice but lentils and greens would be just lovely as well. Whatever you choose to serve with it, be sure it simply seasoned – this dish calls for subtle sides the balance it’s dynamism.

Fast Easy Fresh

Moroccan Shrimp and Red Onion Sauté

1 teaspoon whole coriander seeds
3/4 teaspoon cardamom seeds
3/4 teaspoon cumin
3 tablespoons good olive oil
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger (I subbed Gourmet Garden ginger in equal quantity and I honestly don’t think it made any difference)
2 teaspoons hot chili sauce (ex. Sriracha)
12 uncooked large shrimp, peeled, deveined, tails left intact
1 red onion, halved, peeled, each half cut into 4 wedges through root end
Fresh cilantro leaves, chopped (for serving)

Ingredients

Toast coriander seeds, cardamom seeds and cumin in small skillet over medium-high heat until fragrant, shaking skillet, about 1 minute.

Toasting Spices

Coarsely grind spices in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder (or just crush spices with the end of a wooden spoon). Transfer to large bowl; mix in oil, ginger, chili sauce, cinnamon and honey. Season with salt and pepper. Add shrimp and onion; toss to coat.

Heat large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion; cook until blackened in spots, turning occasionally, about 5 minutes.

       Red Onion in PanRaw Shrimp Added to PanAll Cooked in Pan

Add shrimp and marinade; sauté until just cooked through; about 3 minutes. Transfer shrimp and onion to plate. Top with cilantro. 

Served

Smoked Pork with Carolina Peach BBQ Sauce and Cheddar Biscuits

Once again, it’s been awhile. When constantly out of town, recording recipes seems be one of the things I let fall to the wayside, kind of like dusting. Inspired by the end of summer and the onset of fall and after spending time in what I call yankeeland (aka anything above North Carolina), I needed a good dose of Southern food.

After spending a couple days with his family in Waxhaw, Caleb came back with a TON of smoked pork shoulder and beef brisket from his dad and lots of peaches from his mom.

Of course pork and peaches are a stellar match; I shredded up some of the pork shoulder and decided I’d try my hand at a peach bbq sauce. Rather than serving with buns as pulled pork sandwiches, I made good old biscuits with sharp cheddar and green onion and served with simple cut green beans with nothing but garlic, salt and pepper.

The biscuits are pretty non-traditional and super simple but the ingredients are not measured at all. I fix biscuits this way when I plan on serving them with something heavy on top, in this case, pulled pork.  

Carolina Peach BBQ Sauce

Ingredients

1 large peach, peeled, pit removed and finely chopped
1/2 small red onion, finely chopped
1 T butter
1/4 c spicy peach preserves
1/3 c honey
1/3 c dijon mustard
1/3 c red wine vinegar
1 T worcestershire sauce
1/2 c chicken stock, optional

In a medium sauce pan, melt butter and add chopped red onion. Saute until translucent.

Sauteeing Onion

Add remaining ingredients, stir and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 40 minutes, stirring frequently.

BBQ Sauce Ingredients

If sauce becomes too thick for your liking, add chicken stock and increase cooking time by 10 minutes.

Cooked Sauce

Set sauce to the side. If smoked pork shoulder is hot, allow to cool completely. 

Smoked Pork

Using your hands and a fork, pull the pork apart. It does not need to be perfectly shredded.

Pulled Pork

Pour that yummy Carolina Peach BBQ Sauce on top and stir it up real good. Serve it on top of sliced biscuits and make sure the biscuits are covered completely.

Pork with BBQ SauceCheddar-Green Onion Biscuits

Instead of a list of ingredients, I’ll just provide basic instructions for these. 

Preheat oven to 400 F. 

Add desired amount of flour (any kind of your choosing, I use whole wheat) to a large mixing bowl. Stir in a good pinch of baking powder and salt.

Little by little add in yogurt, stirring as you go. Stop adding yogurt once mixture is crumbly and yogurt and flour and evenly distributed. Now, stir in cream until dough becomes a thick and discernible ball.

Stir in freshly shredded sharp cheddar cheese and chopped green onion.

Place dough on a well floured surface and roll out to 1/2″ thickness. Using a biscuit cutter (or top of a mason jar, like I like to do), cut out biscuits and place on greased baking sheet.

Biscuits Before Oven

Cook for about 15 minutes or until golden. If using whole wheat flour, biscuits will be significantly darker than usual. 

Cooked Biscuits

Keep in mind that the texture of these biscuits won’t be quite the same as a traditional, fluffy Southern biscuit. They are however, very tasty and still definitely biscuits.